Graduate Students (PhD, MS)

Ph D Students:

Kalb Stevenson  

       Kalb graduated in Spring 2009.  His research was supported by the NSF's Functional & Regulatory Systems cluster (Grant No. 0616245, PI: Ian van Tets) and focused on seasonality of reproduction, body composition and energy expenditure in a common non-hibernating Alaskan rodent: the northern red-backed vole (Myodes rutilus).

Publications:

Thesis    
  1. Stevenson, K.T., 2009 The seasonality of reproduction, body composition and energy expenditure in the northern red-backed vole (Myodes rutilus).  Ph. D. thesis.  Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage & Dept. of Biology & Wildlife, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Journal articles:

  1. Stevenson, K.T., Mayfield, J.M., T.N. Lee, I.G. van Tets, B.M. Barnes and . Tien.  in review.  Effect of overwintering on body mass and bone mineral density in two hibernating mammals: arctic ground squirrels (Spermophilus parryii) and American Black Bears (Ursus americanus).  Submitted to  Physiological and Biochemical Zoology

  2. Stevenson, K.T., I.G. van Tets and D.Y. Chon  2009  Making no bones about it: Bone mineral density changes seasonally in a non-hibernating Alaskan rodent, the northern red-backed vole (Myodes rutilus).  Journal of Mammalogy 90(1):25-31.  Click here for PDF version

  3. Stevenson, K.T., I.G. van Tets and L.A. Nay.  2009  The seasonality of reproduction in photoperiod responsive and non-responsive northern red-backed voles (Myodes rutilus) in south central Alaska.  Canadian Journal of Zoology 87(2):152-164.  Click here for PDF version

  4. Stevenson, K.T. and I.G. van Tets.  2008. Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) can accurately and non-destructively measure the body composition of small, free-living rodents.  Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.  81(3):373-382.  Click here for PDF version

Research reports:

These articles report original research that was completed in Dr. van Tets' laboratory under Kalb and Ian's joint supervision by High School students from Alaska Native or other under-represented minority backgrounds through the NIH NIDDK STEP UP program (formerly the NIH NIDDK Summer Research Apprenticeship Program).  The first author in each case is the high school student. 

  1. Anahonak, J., K.T. Stevenson. and I.G. van Tets.  In press.  Gonadotropin-Inhibitory Hormone, GnIH, and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone, GnRH, Activity in the Brain of the Northern Red-back Vole, Myodes rutilus.  Accepted for publication in Ethnicity and Disease

  2. Chon, D.Y., K.T. Stevenson and I.G. van Tets.  2008.  Seasonal changes in bone mineral density in the northern red-backed vole; A potential model organism for disuse osteoporosis.  Ethnicity and Disease 18(2) (Suppl. 1): 32-34. Click here for PDF version

  3. Nay L., K.T. Stevenson and I.G. van Tets.  2007. Seasonal Changes in the Reproductive Organs and Body Condition of Northern Redbacked Voles (Clethrionomys rutilus). Ethnicity and Disease 17(4) (Suppl. 5): 58-60. Click here for PDF version

Other publications:

  1. Stevenson, K.T.  2009  Fresh from the tundra.  Alaska Magazine.  April: 24-31.  Click here for PDF version

 

M Sc Students

1)  Naomi Bargmann 

           Naomi intends to graduate in Fall 2009. Her research was supported by Dr. Scott Hatch of the USGS Alaska Science Center  and focused on the use of fatty acids to analyze the diets of seabirds, in particular the Black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla

Thesis

  1. Bargmann,  N.A. in prep.  Using fatty acid signature analysis to study the diet of black-legged kittiwakes, Rissa tridactylaM.Sc. Thesis, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage

Journal articles:

  1. Burns, J.M., Williams, T.M., Secor, S.M., Owen-Smith, N., Bargmann, N.A., Castellini, M.A. 2006.  New insights into the physiology of foraging.  Physiological and Biochemical Zoology.  79(2): 242-249.  Click here for PDF version.

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2)  Jacob Templin     

       Jake intends to graduate in Spring 2010.  His research was supported by the NSF's Functional & Regulatory Systems cluster (Grant No. 0616245, PI: Ian van Tets) and is focused on the effect of season and climatic variables on energy use by non-hibernating high latitude rodents.  To do this, he monitored the Field Metabolic Rate of northern red-backed voles, Myodes rutilus, housed in both indoor and outdoor environments in collaboration with the Alaska Zoo

Thesis

  1. Templin,  J.  in prep.  Seasonal variation in the field metabolic rate of the Northern Red-Backed Vole, Myodes rutilusM.Sc. Thesis, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage

 

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This page was last edited on:  18 September 2009